Regeneration

A Testimony: Depression, BPD, Unmanagable Anger, Suicidal Thoughts

I am 47 years old now. One of the greatest difficulties I have found in coping with BPD - in addition to experiencing all emotions in a very intense manner - is my severe anger-control problem. I have also struggled with deep, dark, suicidal depressions - sometimes lasting for many months. Intense, agonizing anxiety has been another symptom of this disorder that has created great pain in my heart, and which has led me to isolate myself for a great part of my adult life due to my phobia of social settings and general anxiety whenever I am not in my "safe zone", which means my apartment.

Carlos "FROM homosexuality TO holiness"

To play video click on the arrow in the middle of the picture.

Debbie "FROM gay TO godliness"

To play video, click on the arrow in the middle of the picture.

The Nature and Basis of Assurance

At the commencement of Matthew 5 we find the Lord Jesus pronouncing blessed a certain class of people. They are not named as "believers" or saints," but instead are described by their characters; and it is only by comparing ourselves and others with the description that the Lord Jesus there gave, that we are enabled to identify such. First, He said, "Blessed are the poor in spirit." To be "poor in spirit" is to have a feeling sense that in me, that is, in my flesh, "there dwelleth no good thing" (Rom. 7:18). It is the realization that 1 am utterly destitute of anything and everything which could commend me favorably to God's notice. It is to recognize that I am a spiritual bankrupt.

A Right Heart


1) A right heart is a NEW heart (Ezek. 36:26). It is not the heart with which a person is born—but another heart put in them by the Holy Spirit. It is a heart which has new tastes, new joys, new sorrows, new desires, new hopes, new fears, new likes, new dislikes. It has new views about the soul, sin, God, Christ, salvation, the Bible, prayer, heaven, hell, the world, and holiness. It is like a farm with a new and good tenant. "Old things are passed away. Behold all things are become new" (2 Cor. 5:17).

Scriptures for Renewing the MindPremium Content

While some might question whether the Bible is relevant to today, I maintain that it is. I have experienced the power of God's Word in my life. Specifically, the principle of renewing the mind made all the difference in my eating disorder recovery.

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The End of Toxic Pride

I've fed on pods, I must confess,
Out in the field, when hunger pressed,
What's meant for swine I've feasted on,
Midst dung I dined, my gusto gone.

I took my fill of stagnant swill,
Ingested things that might have killed,
I found myself in distant land
Fresh out of luck, life out of hand.

There should have been an ending there
In blending with the empty stares
But something woke and pushed aside
The prison of my toxic pride.

When given strength to journey back
I found the fruit I sorely lacked,
The wine that's poured from royal blood,
A Father's feast, prepared in love.

A Lifelong Reconstruction ProjectPremium Content

One of the most sobering chapters in all of Scripture can be found in Deuteronomy 6. In this well-known portion of the Old Testament, we are informed that the Law of God is more than just a series of directives handed down by a Divine Deity. In fact, we learn that obeying the Law is not only a life-long pursuit, but a pursuit that can actually lead to a longer life (6:2). We are also told that obeying the Law is “for our good always and for our survival” (6:24). Further, we are tasked with the mission of not only obeying this Law ourselves, but of passing it on and teaching it to our children (6:6-7). Any one of these three components, when considered on its own, should be enough to convince us that God takes His Law seriously.

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Origins of the Christian Recovery Movement

Effective Christian Help for Drunks by Five Important Groups & Organizations in the 1800's-long before A.A. was founded in 1935

Young Men's Christian Association lay workers (1870). Non-denominational work
in revival meetings with conversions and Bible studies. Galvanized the Great Awakening of 1875 in St. Johnsbury. (Bob and Bill both had "Y" connections).

The Gospel Rescue Missions (1872) exemplified by Jerry McAuley and the Water Street Mission in NY, NY - followed by Calvary Rescue Mission where Bill and Ebby each separately made their decisions for Jesus Christ.

Evangelists and Revivalists (1875) Charles Finney, John B. Gough, Dwight Moody, Ira

Who is Your Hero?

I recently heard a surprising, thought-provoking response to that question. A critique group gathered to practice their public speaking skills. They challenged each other to do a two-minute impromptu talk answering the question, “Who is your hero?”

The last speaker began with an attention-grabbing opening line: I am my hero.

Sounds a bit self-centered, doesn’t it? I wondered immediately whether the guy had trouble getting his big head through the door.

But his explanation made a lot of sense. He’s right, and I really admire the unique look at a common question. Based on his thoughts, here’s my take on myself as my own hero.

I’m a Hero?

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