Archive for the ‘Things to Ponder’ Category

So Much to do Every Day…

Friday, March 17th, 2017

A story is told of an old man who lived long ago. A friend asked him the cause of his struggles, since in the evening he so often had great weariness. “Alas,” answered he, “I have so much to do every day; I have . . .
two falcons to tame,
two hares to keep from running away,
two hawks to manage,
a serpent to confine,
a lion to chain, and
a sick man to tend and wait upon.”

“Why, this is only folly,” said the friend, “no man has all these things to do at once.”

“Yet indeed,” he answered, “it is with me just as I have said.

The two falcons are my two eyes, which I must diligently guard, lest something should please them which may be hurtful to my soul.

The two hares are my feet, which I must hold back, lest they should run after evil objects, and walk in the ways of sin.

The two hawks are my two hands, which I must train and keep to work, in order that I may be able to provide for myself and for my brethren who are in need.

The serpent is my tongue, which I must always keep in with a bridle, lest it should speak anything unfitting.

The lion is my heart, with which I have to maintain a continual fight, in order that vanity and pride may not fill it, but that the grace of God may dwell and work there.

The sick man is my own body, which is ever needing my watchfulness and care. All this daily wears out my strength!”

“Blessed is the man who perseveres under trial, because when he has stood the test, he will receive the crown of life that God has promised to those who love Him!” James 1:12 

George Everard, “Daily Warfare!” 1866

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We need a lot of chipping!

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

“They will be Mine–in the day when I make up My jewels!” Malachi 3:17

We need a lot of chipping!” So said a saint as we were talking about the Lord’s gracious dealings with His people. The saying suggested to my mind–the Lord Jesus as the loving Sculptor at work upon the marble of our fallen humanity. There is an angel in the marble–because the pierced hand of the Sculptor has it in His mind, and brings it out by His skill. But there is a “lot of chipping” to be done before the beautiful image of His holy character stands out, displaying the perfection of His work.

The hard stone of unbelief,
the rough points of self-will,
the prominence of worldly ambition,
the sharp angles of pride,
the ugly faults of temper,
the stubborn marks of bad habits,
and the dark veins of selfishness
are some of the things He removes!

“Those God foreknew, He also predestined to be conformed to the likeness of His Son!” Romans 8:29

“God cuts and polishes His jewels in order to make them shine more brightly and beautifully in the crown of His glory in Heaven. All of God’s jewels need polishing!” (Richard Newton)

“God has many sharp-cutting instruments and rough files for the polishing of His jewels. Those He especially loves and means to make the most resplendent–He most often uses His tools upon!” Robert Leighton

~Frederick Marsh

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Our resources are very limited–His are infinite!

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017

“If you then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children–then how much more shall your Father who is in Heaven give good things to those who ask Him?” Matthew 7:11

There is a double contrast here.
First, between an earthly parent and God.
Second, between their respective moral characters.

If an earthly parent does not allow his little ones to starve, but instead freely ministers to their needs–then certainly God will respond to the cries of His own children.
They were but the begetters of our bodies–He is the maker of our souls.
Their resources are very limited–His are infinite!

What abundant evidence God has given the Christian that He is his loving heavenly Father!
The sending of His Son,
the gift of His Spirit,
the bestowal of eternal life,
His erection of the throne of grace,
the innumerable promises He has made–
all exclude the idea that He will turn a deaf ear unto their requests.

But more, our parents were “evil”–whereas God is essentially good. The principal emphasis lies there. If  those who by nature are corrupt and filled with selfishness could find in their hearts to bestow needful things on their offspring–then how safely may He who has nothing in Him to check His benignity and bounty be relied upon. He is an ocean of all blessedness, which is ever seeking an outlet to communicate itself to those whom He has loved, chosen, and made His sons and daughters!

Arthur Pink

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Saying a Blessing, Old Fashioned?

Friday, January 27th, 2017

A godly farmer was asked to dine with a well-known gentleman. While there, he asked a blessing at the table as he was accustomed to do at home. His host said jeeringly, “That is old fashioned; it is not customary nowadays for well-educated people to pray before they eat.”

The farmer answered that with him it was customary — but that some of those on his farm never thanked God their food.

“Ah, then,” said the gentleman, “they are sensible and enlightened! Who are they?”

“My pigs!” the farmer answered.

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Be Thankful in All Circumstances

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

One day, Johann Tauler of Strosbourg met a peasant and greeted him, “God give you a good day, my friend!”

The peasant answered briskly, “I thank God that I never have a bad day!”

Tauler, astonished, kept silent for a moment. Tauler then added, “God give you a happy life, my friend.”

The peasant replied composedly, “I thank God that I am never unhappy!”

“Never unhappy!” cried Tauler bewildered, “What do you mean?”

“Well,” came the reply, “When it is sunshine — I thank God; and when it rains — I thank God. When I have plenty — I thank God; and when I am hungry — I thank God. Since God’s will is my will, and whatever pleases God pleases me — I am never unhappy.

Tauler looked upon him with awe. “Who are you?” he asked.

“I am a king!” said the peasant.

“A king?” Tauler asked, “Where is your kingdom?”

The peasant smiled and whispered softly, “In my heart!”

“Be thankful in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you who belong to Christ Jesus.” 1 Thessalonians 5:18

In all circumstances! This comes as a surprise when one considers the vicissitudes of human life. Sickness and health, poverty and wealth, joy and sorrow — are all ingredients of the cup placed to human lips — so all must come within the scope of thanksgiving. Why be thankful for everything? Because God causes everything to work together for good to those who love Him.

J.C. Pittman, 1917

What is Truly Important?

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

Over the triple doorways of a European Cathedral, there are three inscriptions spanning the splendid arches.

Over one is carved a beautiful wreath of roses, and underneath is the lettering:
“All which pleases us — is but for a moment.”

Over the other arch is sculptured a cross, and there are the words:
“All which troubles us — is but for a moment.”

But on the great central entrance to the main aisle, is the inscription:
“That alone is important, which is eternal.”

If we always realize these three truths, we would not let small things trouble us; nor would we be so much interested in the passing pageants of the hour. We would live, as we do not now — for the permanent and the eternal.

“So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen.
For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal!” 2 Corinthians 4:18

J.C. Pittman, 1917

Two Wolves

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

One evening an old Cherokee told his grandson about a battle that goes on inside people. He said, “My son, the battle is between two “wolves” inside us all.

One is Evil. It is anger, envy, jealousy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.

The other is Good. It is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion and faith.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather: “Which wolf wins?”

The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.”

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You Can’t Finish if You Never Begin

Friday, January 13th, 2017

The sermon topic was “Finish Well” and that’s important, but you can’t finish if you never begin.

Seems like lots of folks are afraid to begin. Some wait to figure out their true calling. Some wait for someone else to tell them what to do. Some wait for permission. Some wait for a sign from God. As I listened to the sermon about crossing the finish line with integrity, I couldn’t help wondering how many folks in the audience were still in the starting blocks.

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Copyright by Rich Dixon, All Rights Reserved. Used by permission.
Rich is an author and speaker. He is the author of:
Relentless Grace: God’s Invitation To Give Hope Another Chance
. Visit his web site www.relentlessgrace.com

Life’s Surprises and Interruptions

Monday, January 9th, 2017

For if you remain completely silent at this time,
relief and deliverance will arise for the Jews from another place,
but you and your father?s house will perish.
Yet who knows whether you have come to the kingdom
for such a time as this? (Esther 4:14)


What a week this has been! On Friday my almost 87-year-old mother (who lives with us) became extremely ill, and I had to call for an ambulance. The next few days were split between going back and forth to the hospital, and trying to put out fires here at home. In the midst of it all, my computer died. When I called my trusty computer guy, he was unable to work on it for a couple of days. (As you can see, it has since been fixed, with no loss of data?thank You, Lord!) And Mom is home from the hospital, a bit weaker from the experience, but doing well.

That’s part of life, isn’t it? Being an “order freak,” I really don’t like surprises or interruptions to my planned-out days. But they happen, and will continue to do so as long as we walk on this earth. The important thing is how we handle those surprises and interruptions, and who gets to call the shots and order our steps throughout those days on earth.

Esther learned that lesson the hard way. Though undoubtedly not by choice, she was queen to a pagan king. As such, she lived in luxury and ease, though not without personal sacrifice. Having been raised by a faithful Jew, her uncle Mordecai, it must have been painful for her to share her life with one who didn’t share her faith; not to mention the fact that she had to keep her Jewish heritage and faith a secret if she wanted to preserve her life and position.

Then came the big interruption. Due to the scheming of the evil Haman, the king ordered that all Jews be killed. Mordecai encouraged Esther to use her position to influence the king to find a way to save the Jewish people, but Esther responded that she could be killed if she went to the king with such a request.

Mordecai wisely told her that if she ignored her duty to try to save her people simply because she didn?t want to lose her own life, she and her family would die anyway, since sooner or later her Jewish heritage would be discovered. Then he made one of the most profound observations ever recorded: “Yet who knows whether you have come to the kingdom
for such a time as this?”

We Christians like to think we know why we’re here; what our purpose and calling is. Are we writers? Our purpose must be to write. Are we singers? We must sing. Are we teachers? We shall teach. But what if our writing or singing or teaching is interrupted with a chance to do something bigger; something obviously ordered by God and yet which may cost us our very lives?

Missionary Jim Elliot, who was killed in 1956 while attempting to evangelize the Waodani people through efforts known as Operation Auca, once said that he is no fool who gives up what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose. Esther would have been a fool to try to preserve her own life, rather than risk it in an attempt to save the lives of God?s chosen people. As it turned out, she was successful in saving the Jews, including herself. Why? Because she recognized and responded to the interruption in her life that summarized her reason for having been placed on this earth in the first place.

God created each of us with a purpose, and though we may think we know what that purpose is, in reality we may not have a clue until it sideswipes us, jolting us from our pre-planned, orderly existence with a call to lay down our lives in service to God and others. Will we respond? Or will we be so foolish as to try to hold on to that which cannot be preserved, rather than relinquishing it to gain that which cannot be lost?

Esther understood that great truth, as did Jim Elliot. May we willingly and joyfully walk in it as well?

MaciasCopyright Kathi Macias, all rights reserved. Used by permission.
Kathi Macias is a multi-award winning writer who has authored seventeen books. Her newest book “Beyond Me. Living a You-first Life in a Me-first World” (New Hope Publishers) The author can be reached at: http://www.kathimacias.com

The Year Before Our Eyes

Friday, January 6th, 2017

“As your days’ so shall your strength be.”
Deuteronomy 33:25


The year before our eyes may hold in its bosom, events which may deeply concern and affect us. We do not know what is to come. What personal trials, what family trials, what providential trials may await us – we do not know. Every year hitherto has brought its trials in its train; and how can we expect the coming year to be exempt?

Sickness may attack our bodies, death enter our families, difficulties beset our circumstances, trials and temptations exercise our minds, snares entangle our feet, and many dark and gloomy clouds, make our path one of heaviness and sorrow.

If, indeed, we are His, whatever our trials may be – His grace will be sufficient for us.

He who has delivered – can and will deliver.

And He who has brought us thus far on the road, who has so borne with our crooked manners in the wilderness and never yet forsaken us – though we have so often forsaken Him – will still lead us along; will still guide and guard us, and be our God, our Father and our Friend – not only to the end of the next year, if spared to see it, but the end of our life.

Blessed with His presence – we need fear no evil;
favored with His smile – we need dread no foe;
upheld by His power – we need shrink from no trial;
strengthened by His grace – we need panic at no suffering.

Knowing what we are and have been when left to ourselves – the slips that we have made, the snares that we have been entangled in, the shame and sorrow that we have procured to ourselves – well may we dread to go forth in the coming year alone. Well may we say,
“If Your Presence does not go with us do not send us up from here!” Exodus 33:15

J. C. Philpot
1802-1869