Daily Articles

Loving Your Alcoholic WifePremium Content

If anyone knows what it's like to live with an alcoholic wife it would be my husband, who for several years, battled with my addiction with me. That's right, he battled alcoholism with me. Because I have been sober for fifteen years I can write about addiction with confidence. Alcoholism is a family affair and without knowing how to handle addiction, being married to an alcoholic is an ongoing battle. It does not matter who is the alcoholic, wife or husband – what matters is how you handle the affects. If your wife is an alcoholic there is great hope in her recovery by how you manage the addiction.

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He is an Alcoholic and Asked Me to Marry Him. What Can I Expect?Premium Content

Ask Angie: The alcoholic man I love, is kind, smart, funny and spiritual. He has to drink most days. He can't have 1 or 2 beers. When he drinks, he drinks until he is drunk. Then he becomes the other man I live with. Verbally demanding to the point of abuse. He complains he does not get enough attention or sex, that he needs it every day. I love him, but I am worn out. My friends and family think he is a great man. He works hard, he loves his children and me more than anything.... he has only 1 fault... he is an alcoholic. He has asked me to marry him... I can't commit until he proves our relationship comes first, not alcohol. I have detached. I don't argue or fuss. I just calmly just let him know that I will marry him, when "he" is ready.

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When the Wheels Come OffPremium Content

I grew up in the 70's and 80's when parents still told their kids to go outside and play. My friends and I would spend all day in the yard and when we got hot and sweaty enough we'd run to the back patio, open the water spigot on the side of the house and get down on our hands and knees so we could get low enough to turn our mouths up for a drink of water that splashed all over our faces and down our necks. In the evenings I remember seeing my parents shaking their heads as they watched the oil crises in the 1970's unfold on the nightly news. Gas prices skyrocketed to 73 cents a gallon! "Turn it off," my mother would say to my dad. "Good grief! The wheel's are coming off but they make it sound like the world's ending."

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How Can I Trust My Husband Again?Premium Content

Ask Angie: I am finding it hard to trust my husband again. We've been married for 31 years. this Valentine's day and in year 28 I found out he was heavily into drugs, which he now claims to be free of, but I still have a hard time believing him because of the extent he wants to hide his use. All the lies, deceit, and now the unwillingness to discuss it with me, leaves me with many unanswered questions.

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Living with an Alcoholic: A Healthy DetachmentPremium Content

The best thing you can do when dealing with an alcoholic spouse is to detach from the abuse of the alcoholic. You can do this if you truly love your spouse and want to help them to possible sobriety. The more you focus all your energies on the alcoholic, the less likely he is to get sober. This article focuses on how you can detach and remain healthy mentally.

Don’t Make Alcoholism Your Problem

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Jumping the Hurdle of AddictionPremium Content

I know that you can jump the hurdle of addiction and live a content filled peaceful life because I did, and I am. In my marriage and life I went through a lot of terrible emotions and marital issues during my bout with alcohol addiction. I have been sober for fourteen-years now, and I have never craved a drink, nor have I ever wanted to have a drink, socially or otherwise.

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Taking Step 4

When I was first told about making a searching and fearless moral inventory of myself I was filled with FEAR. And then to admit to God, to myself, and to another human being the exact nature of my wrongs -- YIKES! Where to start??

Instead of starting with me, I think it starts with God and His Word. We need to hear, read and study scripture. By doing this we learn what God wants us to be--what His standards for us are. We must make ourselves available to God through meditation, prayer and by serving Him rather than our own needs, material desires, and lusts.

Amazed by Common Grace

Common Grace. It is a term used in theology to describe the grace God gives to every living person on planet earth. It is called "common," not because it is not worth that much, but because everyone alive gets it.

Grace by definition can never be demanded. God gives grace, not because He has to, but because He decides to. The scripture says that God "makes His sun rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust" (Matthew 5:45).

What is Your Purpose?

Doing what I am supposed to do, according to the Bible, is one of the hardest things in life. It’s easy to be self-indulgent. It’s easy to be lazy. It’s easy to hide behind my emotions, my desires, my fears. It’s hard to be a Christian.

Proverbs 19:3
One’s own folly leads to ruin,
yet the heart rages against the Lord.

When Loved Ones Resent Your Recovery

It is not uncommon for those who start a new life in recovery to encounter resentment from their spouses, loved ones and/or friends. If this is the case, you will be put to the test by those who care for you most. This can be confusing because those who should be encouraging you in recovery are actually making it more difficult.

Your spouse may become resentful because you are spending more time at recovery meetings and less time with them. Stand strong and lovingly explain to your spouse that you need to take time for yourself in order to get your life back on track. Suggest that they come with you to open meetings where the loved ones are welcome so they can better understand your recovery process.

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