Alcohol, Info & Help

Addiction FAQ

Q. I would like to attend a meeting in the chat room, how do I join?
A. To join any of our online meetings, you need to register with CIR HERE. It's a two-step process, you will receive one email asking you to confirm your email address by clicking on a link, and a second email assigning you a password.

Q. Can you help me find a meeting in my area?
A. If you are looking for a face-to-face meeting near you, check our Online Database

Q. I am doing a paper on recovery can you send me more information?

Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism FAQ

What is alcoholism?

Alcoholism, also known as alcohol dependence, is a disease that includes the following four symptoms:

Craving--A strong need, or urge, to drink.

Loss of control--Not being able to stop drinking once drinking has begun.

Physical dependence--Withdrawal symptoms, such as nausea, sweating, shakiness, and anxiety after stopping drinking.

Tolerance--The need to drink greater amounts of alcohol to get "high."

Family Members and Your Addiction

Are you witnessing a decline in your family's lifestyle and overall happiness? Maybe you are the culprit.

As your tolerance level for your drug of choice or habit increases, more and more of the substance or act is needed to get the desired effect. Though your behavior is now having an obvious negative effect on you and those around you, they rationalize, excuse and minimize the problems just as you do.

Disorderly Sleep

Sleep had been elusive, the reasons obvious. How can one sleep with the desire for the drug at hand? And being equipped with sufficient negative motivation, you’ll find it difficult to get any rest at all.

In full-blown addiction, you’ll not be plagued by guilt or loneliness or humiliation, nor will you be depressed with the indignity of prison or jail. You will be consumed with dope trekking and questions like...“Who’s got it?”, “Where can I get it?”, “How good is it?”, “How much is it?” and “How can I raise the money for it?”

Addiction - Basic Information

Many people view drug abuse and addiction as strictly a social problem. Parents, teens, older adults, and other members of the community tend to characterize people who take drugs as morally weak or as having criminal tendencies. They believe that drug abusers and addicts should be able to stop taking drugs if they are willing to change their behavior.

These myths have not only stereotyped those with drug-related problems, but also their families, their communities, and the health care professionals who work with them. Drug abuse and addiction comprise a public health problem that affects many people and has wide- ranging social consequences.

If I have an addiction, can I still be saved?

If I have an addiction, can I still be saved?

Yes! We are not called to perfect ourselves before we come to God. If we could do that, then Jesus could have spared himself the agony of dying of the cross in payment for our sins. He would have simply instructed us to live sin-free lives. He knew, though, that man is utterly incapable of cleansing himself, as demonstrated throughout the Old Testament.

Am I An Alcoholic? (Self-test #1)

A self-test questionnaire to aid in the evaluation of patterns of Alcohol consumption. This instrument is an adaptation of the MAST test. No claims as to the validity of the results and the results should be considered only as an "indicator" as to the presence or absence of Alcoholism.

What About the "Disease Concept" of Addiction ?

Q: Doesn't the promotion of the "disease concept" help addicts avoid taking responsibility for their behavior?

A: The only people I've ever heard use the "disease concept" as an excuse are practicing alcoholics who have no real intention of changing. I hear something totally different from Rescue Mission counselors and other professionals who subscribe to what has been called the "clinical approach" to treatment and recovery.

Helping Patients Who Drink Too Much

This Guide is written for primary care and mental health clinicians. It has been produced by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), a component of the National Institutes of Health, with guidance from physicians, nurses, advanced practice nurses, physician assistants, and clinical researchers.

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