Self-Examination

Codependent Relapse Checklist

Early Warning Signs

    Situational loss of daily structure.
    Lack of personal care
    Inability to effectively set and maintain limits
    Loss of constructive planning
    Indecision
    Compulsive behavior
    fatigue or lack of rest

Changes I Want to Make - Worksheet

This worksheet will help you to clearly see the changes you want to make in your life and to make the necessary plans realize your goals.

My Benefits and Responsibilites of Being in Recovery - Worksheet

Use this worksheet to list the benefits you are receiving or plan to receive as a result of being in recovery. Use it to list your responsibilities of being in Recovery.

Am I An Alcoholic? (Self-test #1)

A self-test questionnaire to aid in the evaluation of patterns of Alcohol consumption. This instrument is an adaptation of the MAST test. No claims as to the validity of the results and the results should be considered only as an "indicator" as to the presence or absence of Alcoholism.

Achieve Your Goals Worksheet

This worksheet will assist you in recognizing,setting and achieving your goals.

12 Step Questions

This is a list of questions for working the 12 Step program for recovery from addictive behavior. You are invited to pick those questions that seem most relevant to your recovery and answer them to the best of your ability.

Men and Depression

Depression is a medical condition that affects the body, mood, and thoughts. It affects the way one eats and sleeps. It affects how one thinks about hings, and one's self-perception. A depressive disorder is not the same as a passing blue mood. It is not a sign of personal weakness or a condition one can will or wish away. People with a depressive illness cannot merely “pull themselves together” and get better. Without treatment, symptoms can last for weeks, months, or years. However, appropriate treatment, often involving medication and/or short-term psychotherapy, can help most people who suffer from depression.

90 Tools for Sobriety

1 ) Stay away from that first drink, taking the 1st step daily.
2 ) Attend recovery meetings regularly and get involved.
3 ) Progress is made ONE DAY AT A TIME.
4 ) Use the 24 Hour plan.
5 ) Remember, your disease is incurable, progressive and fatal.
6 ) Do first things first.
7 ) Don't become too tired.
8 ) Eat at regular hours.
9 ) Use the telephone. (not just after the fact but during too.).
10) Be active - don't just sit around. Idle time will kill you.

11) Use the Serenity Prayer.
12) Change old routines and patterns.
13) Don't become too hungry.
14) Avoid loneliness.
15) Practice control of your anger.
16) Air your resentments.

Ten Helpful Tips for a Successful Recovery

1) Formulate and stamp indelibly on your mind a mental picture of yourself as succeeding. Hold this picture tenaciously. Never permit it to fade. Your mind will seek to develop this picture. Never think of yourself as failing; never doubt the reality of the mental image. That is most dangerous, for the mind always tries to complete what it pictures. So always picture "success" no matter how badly things seem to be going at the moment.

2) Whenever a negative thought concerning your personal powers come to mind, deliberately voice a positive thought to cancel it out.

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